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The Vintage Tea Party Book: A Must For Tea Party Fanatics

 

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I bought a book today which is absolutely, fantastically, smack-you-in-the-face awesome! It’s called The Vintage Tea Party Book and it’s by – I just love her name – Angel Adoree.

I’m a huge fan of books about tea parties, dinner parties and home entertaining because it’s based on something I love to do – have a house full of people eating, drinking and having a bloody good time! Angel says in her book that her parents ‘ have always been motivated by feeding people’s souls with food laughter and cocktails,’ – and that pretty much sums up the story of my life! And like Angel, I think my own parents played a big part in my love of home entertaining as it wasn’t unusual for them to have dinner parties and gatherings at home when I was growing up. I was allowed to join in even though I should have been tucked up in bed. But I grew up with memories  of Dad’s awful jokes; raucous laughter; happy people, and empty dishes as everyone loved Mum’s cooking. So it’s no surprise that when I grew up I had an overwhelming desire to recreate those fabulous evenings.

Angel Adoree

Angel Adoree

The first thing you notice about the cover of The Vintage Tea Party Book is the shades of red, white and blue, and the images of top hats, monocles, pocket watches, Union Jacks, pipes, a cake stand, china teacups and teapots, pearls, butterflies and rose buds. What you get is a cross between a quintessential British vibe with full-on vintage glamour – two themes which feature heavily in this book. This suits The Vintage Tea Party Book down to a, well, tea!

The cover also explains that The Vintage Tea Party Book is ‘a complete guide to hosting the perfect tea party,’ but in reality it is so much more than that. What you essentially get is Angel Adoree between a hardback cover. We get a glimpse into the author’s life with pictures of her family, friends, and some childhood snaps. There are also quite a few pics of the present day Angel; a buxom lady with cherry red lips, and hair the exact same colour worn in a victory roll.

We hear about her childhood, work, entrance into the world of business, appearance on BBC’s Dragon’s Den, and her business venture, The Vintage Patisserie. And as if her appearance wasn’t enough of an indicator, the reader also learns about Angel’s lifelong love affair with all things vintage.

The Vintage Tea Party Book

The Vintage Tea Party Book

 

The Vintage Tea Party Book contains more than just recipes for a good tea party. There are ideas about how to host a party; helpful hints about sourcing vintage items; fashion and beauty advice for those who want to look 1940s; grooming advice for men; a little about the history of the Union Jack, and suggestions for games to play. There’s also arts and crafts with instructions for sewing aprons; drying edible flowers; making a butterfly display, and more. And let’s not forget templates for invitation and thank you cards. All this before we even get to the recipes.

And you won’t be disappointed with the recipes. They’re divided into three parts: brunch, afternoon tea, and evening tea.

The usual tea time treats are still there but they’ve been elevated to a more sophisticated level. So instead of your usual cucumber finger sandwiches, you’ve got cream cheese and cucumber heart-shaped, open sandwiches, and there are lemon scones with lavender cream instead of your usual run-of-the-mill (but nonetheless delicious) scones with clotted cream. There are some really unusual and delicious sounding treats such as hot baked grapefruit; chilled raspberry soup; crab choux, and pork and lemon quail scotch eggs. I especially liked the sound of the romantic sounding rose panna cotta, and the very unusual rose petal sandwich. There are also recipes for a selection of drinks including iced teas, smoothies, cocktails and hot drinks. I particularly want to try the white chocolate mocha and the bourbon slush.

Cream cheese and cucumber hearts

Cream cheese and cucumber hearts

The Vintage Tea Party Book is most definitely going to be one of the most inspiring books I own, and I can’t wait to try out the recipes and put the other suggestions to good use.

And just to give you a hint of how awesome this book is, I’ve posted Angel’s  recipe for the divine sounding cherry and dark chocolate trifle shots. Yum!

Angel Adoree, we adore thee!

CHERRY AND DARK CHOCOLATE TRIFLE SHOTS

INGREDIENTS:

6 sponge fingers, broken into small pieces

100ml cherry brandy or chocolate liqueur

50g dark chocolate, grated

1 pack of dark cherry jelly, made up according to instructions, then chopped up

jar of morello cherries

100ml custard

100ml whipped cream

METHOD:

  1. Arrange sponge finger pieces at the bottom of 6 shot glasses.
  2. Add 1 tablespoon of chosen liqueur to each one.
  3. Sprinkle with 1 teaspoon chocolate.
  4. Once the sponge fingers have absorbed the liqueur, add a heaped tablespoon of prepared jelly to each shot.
  5. Top with a few cherries and more grated chocolate.
  6. To serve, top each shot with a heaped tablespoon of custard, and a tablespoon of whipped cream.
  7. Finish with decorative sprinkle of grated chocolate.

The Vintage Tea Party Book by Angel Adoree

Mitchell Beazley

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Things That Make Me Go Ewwww!

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I never thought of myself as a fussy person when it comes to food, especially when compared to Mr.D, who has a list of food dislikes that’s almost as tall as he is! I considered myself to be the kind of person who’ll eat anything – or at least give it a try. But a conversation about food the other day made me realise that I had an awful lot of food hates myself. In fact after sharing them with you, I doubt I’ll ever be invited to dinner again!

1. Glacé cherries

This might seem a little ironic considering I love cherries, but they have to be either fresh or dried – I can even live with the tinned variety. But glacé cherries for me are a huge non-no. Their bright, tomato-red colour just puts me off as I know that real cherries aren’t supposed to be that colour. In fact for years I thought that they’re weren’t ‘real’ cherries as they didn’t look or taste like the cherries that I love but they are – they’re maraschino cherries that have been stoned and candied in a sugar syrup.

Even as a child I’ve never liked them, and my dislike for glacé cherries still continues. As much as I adore cherry bakewells, fruit cake and Christmas pudding, I always pick out the offending glacé cherries.

Image from glacecherries.com

Image from glacecherries.com

 

2. Smoked salmon

I love, love, love salmon. It’s one of my fave foods. So you’d think I’d be a huge fan of smoked salmon, right? Wrong! Smoked salmon and I never really hit it off. I never liked the taste or the texture. I know it’s considered a luxury delicacy, but I could never acquire a taste for it. In fact, give me a tin of salmon over the smoked stuff any day!

 

Image from wikihow.com

Image from wikihow.com

3. Quiche

Oh my goodness – if there’s a food I really cannot stomach, it’s quiche. I’ve never liked it and they used to serve the horrid stuff  for school dinners on a regular basis. I don’t think I’ve ever eaten a whole slice of quiche. I’ve given it a good go but that taste, that smell… no, just not happening!

image from bbcfood.com

image from bbcfood.com

 

4. Green banana

Green bananas are usually served in savoury dishes and feature in Caribbean, South American, African and South Asian cuisines – cuisines I enjoy a great deal.   I don’t come across green bananas very often, thankfully. But when I have, I’ve never really enjoyed them so tend to pick them out. I don’t like the texture – and the fact that I believe bananas should be yellow and sweet probably has something to do with my dislike of them!

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5. Cooked peppers

Now I can eat raw peppers without any problem at all, and I don’t believe that a salad is a salad without them. But for some reason, I don’t enjoy peppers when they’ve been cooked. Unlike many of the foods on this list, I can actually eat cooked peppers but then again I’ve had to – you won’t believe how many dishes contain cooked peppers. It’s just that I’d prefer not to! I don’t really like the flavour or texture of peppers when they’ve been cooked.

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6. Non- peeling oranges

I’ve always had a bit of a love-hate relationship with oranges. One of those things in life that just can’t be explained. But even though I’m happy to OD on oranges when I have a really bad cold, they have to be of the peeling variety. I can’t be doing with all that cutting malarkey. And since childhood, I’ve never been able to stand the sight of those navel oranges – definitely not for me!

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7. Soft jelly sweets

Now I’ve always had a sweet tooth so naturally I love sweets. But I don’t like those ultra soft, sugar-coated jelly sweets. I’m not totally sure why – I vaguely remember being sick after eating too many of these as a child so I’m sure that’s got a lot to do with it – but they’ve always made me feel a bit queasy after tucking into a few, so I tend to give them a miss. I prefer the jelly sweets with a harder texture.

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8. Curried/stewed fish

OK, so I love fish, I love curries, and I love stews. I even like fish stews and curries. But I’m very fussy about how the fish is cooked. It has to be in chunks rather than steaks, and there shouldn’t be any huge bones and certainly no skin, as  I hate the texture – all slimy and nasty. Not good!

Image from bbcfood.com

Image from bbcfood.com

 

 

9. Duck

Duck is very popular with many people but I personally have never understood the appeal. It has a rather strong flavour that I really don’t like but if I did have to eat it, I’d prefer to have my duck cooked a bit longer than most people would prefer. I’ve tried to get into it but I’ve accepted that my tastebuds are different to everyone else’s and duck just isn’t for me.

bbcfood.co.uk

bbcfood.co.uk

 

10. Offal

I reckon it’s a small minority of people who can stomach offal – but I’m not one of them. The smell alone is horribly off-putting, and although I’ve tried classics such as steak and kidney pie, and  liver and onions,  it’s not something that I’m in a hurry to sample again.

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If any of you have any ‘food nasties,’ I’d love to hear about them!

 

 

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Passionate About Grenadilla!

 

 

 

 

Everyone who knows me knows that although I try to eat healthy and like fruit, I’m not really an apples and oranges kind of girl. I love anything that’s a bit out of the ordinary so I can’t get enough of exotic fruits. Dragon fruit, mango, lychees, rumbutans… you name it, I’ve tried it. Or so I thought… After being introduced to granadillas by a friend this week, I tried them for the first time. “If you like passion fruit, you’ll love granadillas,” said my friend confidently. And he wasn’t wrong. The granadilla is indeed a relative of the delicious passion fruit and hails from South America. Whereas passion fruits have a tough purple skin, granadillas – which are larger in size – have an inedible, shiny, orange-gold skin which appears hard at first but is actually surprisingly fragile. There is a very spongy pith before you get to the edible part of the fruit. As with passion fruit, the edible part consists of black seeds covered in a jelly-like pulp; the only differences being  that the pulp is more of a pale champagne colour and is much sweeter in flavour – almost like honey.

 

 

 

HOW TO PREPARE

  • Granadilla is orange and firm when it is ripe.
  • Ripe granadilla can be refrigerated for a few days.
  • Cut the fruit into two halves as you would with passion fruit.
  •  Scoop out the jelly-like pulp with a spoon. The skin is not to be eaten.

 

HOW TO EAT

  • Granadilla is commonly eaten by itself but it can be cooked or juiced.
  • It makes a great jelly, jam, pie filling, flan topping or cake frosting and also makes a great addition to  fruit salads.

 

 

It also has great nutritional value and is said to be  an excellent source of fibre and essential minerals, such as phosphorus, iron and calcium.  They are usually available in the spring months so now is the time to try them. You never know – it could be your new favourite fruit!

 

 

Try this recipe for  a granadilla meringue pie – a tropical twist on the classic lemon pudding.

GRANADILLA MERINGUE PIE

 

INGREDIENTS:

200g packet of ginger biscuits

80g butter, melted

385g can of condensed milk

125ml lemon juice

5ml grated lemon rind
3 egg yolks
50ml granadilla pulp
3 egg whites
125ml castor sugar
METHOD:
  1. Put the biscuits in a food processor and remove and place in a bowl.
  2. Add the butter and mix well.
  3. Press the mixture into a greased 20cm pie plate and chill in the fridge.
  4. Combine the condensed milk, lemon juice, rind, yolks and granadilla pulp and mix well.
  5. Pour into the crust.
  6. Beat the egg whites until stiff then gradually beat in the castor sugar, reserving 15ml to sprinkle on top.
  7. Pile the meringue on top of the filling.
  8. Sprinkle with the remaining castor sugar.
  9. Bake at 180°C for 20 minutes or until the meringue is light golden brown.
  10. Turn off the oven and leave the pie in for another hour.
  11. Remove and cool completely before serving.
  12. Enjoy!

 

Scrummy Redcurrants

 

I have just tried redcurrants for the very first time. OK, that might be a bit of an exaggeration as I’m sure I’ve had a tart, cake or some other dessert topped with a couple of redcurrants but this is the first time, I’ve properly tried them. I’ve wanted to try them ever since I was five years old and I saw them in my mum’s The Cookery Year cook book, as they looked delicious and ever since then I’d wondered what they taste like.

 

Well, now I know. Redcurrants are surprisingly tart but still quite yummy and I managed to demolish the whole punnet in one sitting. Mr. D tried some too as he’d never eaten them before. Did he like them? Well, it’s quite hard to tell with him but he did say that he found the redcurrants to be quite sharp and didn’t scoff them the same way I did, so maybe it wasn’t such a big hit with him. Oh, well – all the more for me!

 

Redcurrants are related to the gooseberry – which might explain the tartness – and are native to western Europe, although there are similar species in Asia and North America. They’re available from July until September which means that I’ve only just managed to try them while they’re still in season.  Despite their sharp taste, redcurrants are still slightly sweet enough to be eaten raw, although you’d obvious have to sprinkle them with sugar if you’d prefer them to be sweeter. They are quite rich in vitamin C and go well with other fruits and berries.

 

They are a surprisingly versatile fruit and can be served in a multitude of ways.  They can be sprinkled with sugar and served with cream or frosted to decorate desserts and puddings. Redcurrants are also usually used as part of the mixed berries that go into making a delicious Summer Pudding. Because of their high levels of pectin, they make great jams and jellies that taste great with toast or accompanying lamb or game. That’s right – they go quite well with savoury dishes too!

So here are two quick and easy  recipes using delicious  redcurrants. Make these lovely delicacies before redcurrants disappear for another year!

SPICY RED ONION AND REDCURRANT RELISH

Ingredients

  • 4 medium red onions
  • 2 small red peppers,
  • 1 bsp olive oil
  • 2  red chilli,
  • 2 large garlic cloves, chopped
  • 2″ piece fresh ginger, chopped
  • 300ml red wine vinegar
  • 200g light muscovado sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp five spice powder
  • 300g redcurrants, stripped from stalks

Method

  1. Peel onions and cut into thin slices.
  2. Cut red pepper into chunks then mix with the red onion and oil.
  3. Fry for 5-10 mins over a high heat until lightly charred and softened.
  4. Remove from the pan and set aside.
  5. Deseed chillis and chop.
  6. Grate ginger and crush garlic before mixing with the chilli.
  7. Lightly fry chilli mixture before adding half the vinegar.
  8. Bring to the boil then simmer for 5 mins.
  9. Add the onion mixture plus the remaining vinegar, all the sugar, spice and 1 tsp salt.
  10. Bring to the boil then bubble away for about 5 mins until thickened.
  11. Add redcurrants and simmer for about 5 mins more, or until they have burst, but still have some shape and the liquid is syrupy.
  12. Remove and pour into a large heatproof jar. Cover and seal while hot. Keeps in the fridge for up to 3 weeks.

Taste great with sausages, cold meats and goat’s cheese.

ZESTY BERRY COMPOTE

 

Serves 10

Ingredients

100ml berry juice- any kind

100ml water

2 tblspn. Crème de cassis

50g sugar

Zest of 1 lemon

1kg fresh/ frozen summer fruits (blackberries, raspberries, blackcurrants and redcurrants)

10 stems fresh redcurrants

Method

1. Empty the jars of conserve into a large pan. Add the cassis and 200ml water. Heat until warm, then add the frozen fruits and heat for a few minutes until the berries are no longer frozen. Cool and chill.

2. Serve in glasses decorated with fresh redcurrants.

3. Also delicious served with cream, ice-cream or custard.

 

A Trifle Bit Yum!

 

 

I’ve adored trifle ever since I was a child: fruit; custard; jelly; cream; numerous layers of yumminess… what’s there not to like? What’s even more amazing is that with zillions of varieties of trifle you can have a different one for every day of your life and you’ll never get bored!

I don’t believe that trifles should be solely reserved for Christmas but to make one completely from scratch can be quite time consuming. However, I’ve managed to find a recipe for a super quick trifle which takes a fraction of the time to prepare but is still extremely delicious.

ZESTY AND BOOZY RASPBERRY TRIFLE

 

Serves 4

INGREDIENTS:

4 tbsp. sherry or raspberry liquor
1 Madeira cake, sliced 1″ thick
5 tbsp. raspberry jam
250g/9oz fresh/thawed raspberries
290ml/ 1/2 pint ready made custard
Zest and juice of one orange
290ml/ 1/2 pint double cream, whipped

Candied orange peel/slices/fresh orange segments

METHOD:

  • Spread the jam over the cake slices and cut into bite sized cubes.
  • Divide the sponge cubes between four individual dessert glasses.
  • Pour the sherry or raspberry liquor over the sponge.
  • Divide raspberries between the glasses, reserving a few for decoration.
  • Mix the orange zest and juice with the custard and place over the cake and raspberries.
  • Top with a layer of whipped cream and place remaining raspberries and oranges on top.
  • Cool in fridge for 30 minutes before serving.

Enjoy!

 

 

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